Cabo Hurricane History | Los Cabos Weather | iTravel - Cabo
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A wise man once said “The price of paradise is hurricanes and mosquitoes.”

News Article

Hurricane season over in Cabo

Date: 11/30/2016

Today ends Cabo’s official hurricane season, with record rainfall in parts of BCS..

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News Article

Cabo news catch up

Date: 11/9/2016

Catch up on what has been happening in Cabo over the last week...

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News Article

Coastal cleanup on Cabo beaches

Date: 9/22/2016

Cabo authorities team up with Ocean Conservancy to take part in International Coastal Cleanup Day.

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News Article

Hurricane Paine misses Cabo

Date: 9/19/2016

Hurricane Paine is currently about 355 miles west of the southern tip of Baja California Sur

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News Article

Blue flag beaches for Cabo and La Paz

Date: 9/13/2016

Blue flag plans for Balandra and beaches across Baja California Sur.

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News Article

Cabo gets the all clear after Hurricane Newton

Date: 9/7/2016

Much better than it could have been – the real feel of the impact of Hurricane Newton.

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Hurricane History of Cabo

It may be the price of paradise, but thankfully here in Cabo both mosquitoes and hurricanes are very rare. The climate is so dry that the bugs are very rarely a problem unlike other Mexican resorts (such a Cancun for example) and on the few occasions that they do appear they are short lived and not numerous. This is great news because not only do most travellers not get bitten, they are not exposed to mosquito borne diseases such as malaria or dengue.

 Hurricanes are equally scarce although, being below the Tropic of Capricorn, they are still a consideration. Very few have posed a threat as a “direct hit” however and the most likely outcome will be a few days of heavy rain or higher than usual winds. To put it into context, the heavy rains experienced in August 2012 were the first in over a decade!

 So the chances of anything raining on your parade and spoiling your vacation is extremely low.

The history of hurricanes and tropical storms in the area is interesting however:

• August 14–15, 2000: Tropical Storm Ileana briefly threatened the southern areas of the peninsula before suddenly turning out to sea. Large waves caused by the storm likely impacted the coast of that area. No damage or deaths were reported.

• September 30, 2001: Tropical Storm Juliette made landfall near San Carlos. It caused damage and heavy rainfall throughout the peninsula; Cabo San Lucas was "clobbered", with it being cut off from the rest of Mexico for several days. Juliette caused two deaths in or near the peninsula. A maximum of 39.8 in (1,010 mm) fell in Caudaño,[60] the highest known total ever recorded from a tropical cyclone in the sate.

• September 19, 2002: Tropical Storm Iselle briefly threatened Baja California on September 19, before dissipating about 55 mi (90 km) offshore the next day.

• August 25, 2003: Hurricane Ignacio made landfall on the peninsula. Heavy rains caused a flood that swept two rescue workers to their deaths.

• September 22, 2003: Hurricane Marty made landfall near San Jose del Cabo. A total of 4000 houses were destroyed with disruption to boats in the area. The hurricane was responsible for significant flooding and storm surges. Five deaths were reported and 6,000 people were affected. Total damage from the storm was $100 million.

• Early September 2004: Outer rainbands from Hurricane Howard produces heavy rainfall.

• September 19, 2004: Tropical Depression Javier made landfall on the peninsula.[69] Flooding rains damaged portions of a highway.

• July 19, 2005: Tropical Storm Eugene came within range of the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula. Tropical storm watches were issued for the area around Cabo San Lucas for most of the day, but the storm moved away without affecting land.

• September 30-October 3, 2005: Hurricane Otis approached close to the peninsula. Flooding was the only impact.

• July 27–28, 2006: Tropical Storm Emilia passed close to the peninsula, causing isolated reports of gale-force winds and minor flooding and damage.

• September 2, 2006: Hurricane John made landfall on the peninsula. Winds and rain caused heavy damage throughout the peninsula. John killed five people. Damage in Mexico amounted to $663 million (2006 MXN, $60.8 million 2006 USD).

• October 23–25, 2006: Tropical Storm Paul passed close to the peninsula. High surf caused two deaths.

• September, 2007: Hurricane Henriette caused a person to drown in surf south of the peninsula.

• September 2007: The remnants of Hurricane Ivo produces rain without any major impact.

• August 25, 2008: Tropical Storm Julio makes landfall on the peninsula, causing flooding that kills one person.

• September 11, 2008: Tropical Depression Lowell made landfall on the peninsula. No damage is reported.

• October 11, 2008: Hurricane Norbert became the strongest hurricane to hit the western side of the Peninsula. Two towns were nearly completely damaged, with heavy flooding and storm surge reported. Officials estimated that damages from the hurricane was MXN 8.8 billion ($650 million). The worst damage occurred in the municipality of Comondú where 16,000 residents reported damage to their homes.

• September 2, 2009: Hurricane Jimena ties Norbert's short–lived record as is one of the most intense hurricanes to make landfall on the Pacific side of the peninsula. Prior to the arrival of Jimena, civil defense authorities in Los Cabos announced that they would have to evacuate 20,000 families from their homes.The storm later causes widespread flooding and damage, and kills one person. Damage from the storm amounted to MXN$800 million (US$59.8 million).A total of 35,000 were reported to have been left homeless.

• Early October 2009: The remnants of Tropical Storm Olaf cause rain on the peninsula.

• October 14, 2009: Tropical Storm Patricia threatens the southern tip of the peninsula, without causing any appreciable impact.

• October 18 and 19, 2009: Waves from Hurricane Rick kill two people on the peninsula.

• September 20, 2010: Tropical Storm Georgette makes landfall near San Jose del Cabo

 

*** The 2014 Hurricane Season *** 

 

Pacific hurricanes in 2014 have been described by forecasters as being  “particularly ferocious — about 145% more intense than normal.”

Fourteen hurricanes and six tropical storms have formed in the region so far this season. It's the most intense eastern Pacific season since 2006, Colorado State University meteorologist Phil Klotzbach said.

One of the most powerful  eastern Pacific hurricanes on record, Odile, blasted Los Cabos in September with 125-mph winds, killing 15 people in Mexico and the U.S. We covered the devastation and subsequent recovery after Odile here on iTravel-Cabo.com extensively: the scale of the damage being completely overwhelmed by the determination of the recovery and rebuilding. Los Cabos and the Mexican Government definitely set a benchmark for how to get normality back after a major disaster like Odile.

Odile hit just after Hurricane Norbert passed close enough by to cause flash flooding in the region.

"The eastern Pacific hurricanes that moved over the Baja California peninsula into Mexico helped swamp the desert U.S. Southwest, where they received a lot of rainfall," said meteorologist Ryan Maue of the private firm WeatherBell.

At the same time, the Atlantic was fairly quiet, with about 67% of its normal activity, Maue said. Just eight tropical storms and hurricanes formed there, with only one — Hurricane Arthur — making landfall in the U.S.

These swings of quiet Atlantic and active Pacific is typical of the El Niño-like pattern we're in, Maue concluded.

The National Hurricane Center did a good job predicting an above-average Pacific season with 14 to 20 hurricanes and tropical storms, but it forecast just seven to 11 of those would be hurricanes, falling short of the number that actually formed.


For up to date hurricane information you can check out the NOAA site here http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/?epac

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